Kristin Kobes Du Mez is a professor of History and Gender Studies at Calvin University. This was a man who in no way my parents would have supported in 2000, but both voted for him. Copyright © 2020 Apple Inc. All rights reserved. The publicity intro described some of her experiences there, so I hoped the book would shed some light for me on some of the conservative Calvinist-Dutch-Iowan culture I visited over those years. That’s too much. The sub-title doesn't fit. Reading While Black: African American Biblical Interpretation as an Exercise in Hope, The Bible Tells Me So: Why Defending Scripture Has Made Us Unable to Read It. I was raised to believe that men were protectors and women helpers.

Evangelical books, films, music, clothing, and merchandise shape the beliefs of millions. For many years I traveled to northwest Iowa for business were the author grew up. Du Mez also doesn't mine an interesting reference she makes to Bruce Barton's conception of Jesus as "the world's greatest business executive." After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.

This book resonated with me. Jesus and John Wayne is a sweeping account of the last seventy-five years of white evangelicalism, showing how American evangelicals have worked for decades to replace the Jesus of the Gospels with an idol of rugged masculinity and Christian nationalism, or in the words of one modern chaplain, with “a spiritual badass.” As Du Mez explains, the key to understanding this transformation is to recognize the role of culture in modern American evangelicalism. Jesus and John Wayne explores all of these questions through a cast of characters that includes Billy Graham, Bill Gothard, Tim LaHaye, Phyllis Schlafly, James Dobson, and … All of this culminates in the election of Donald Trump as President--and far from being out-of-left-field, the author makes a compelling case for Donald Trump being the epitome of the aggressive and militant masculinity the white evangelical population of the USA was clamouring for. How did a libertine who lacks even the most basic knowledge of the Christian faith win 81 percent of the white evangelical vote in 2016? This dude has nearly died on multiple occasions and rather than let it scar him and turn into a milktoast, it has indeed made him stronger. Jesus and John Wayne is a sweeping account of the last seventy-five years of white evangelicalism, showing how American evangelicals have worked for decades to replace the Jesus of the Gospels with an idol of rugged masculinity and Christian nationalism, or in the words of one modern chaplain, with “a spiritual badass.” The author does an excellent job of reviewing several decades of American history, and the increasing emphasis on an aggressive and militant view of masculinity within the white evangelical population of the United States of America. A scholar of American Christianity presents a seventy-five-year history of evangelicalism that identifies the forces that have turned Donald Trump into a hero of the Religious Right. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

The fractured nation, I felt, wasn’t adequately supported either unless the fractured nation is assumed.

These are among the questions acclaimed historian Kristin Kobes Du Mez asks in Jesus and John Wayne, which delves beyond facile headlines to explain how white evangelicals have brought us to our fractured political moment. She holds a PhD from the University of Notre Dame and her research focuses on the intersection of gender, religion, and politics. Perhaps most disappointing is Du Mez's failure to sufficiently address the link between evangelical culture and Donald Trump. Trump, in other words, is hardly the first flashy celebrity to capture evangelicals’ hearts and minds, nor is he the first strongman to promise evangelicals protection and power.

Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. I’m genuinely interested in a new take on the mental gymnastics some of my evangelical friends must do daily. LinkedIn Link, CEO/Host of The Chris Voss Show & Chris Voss Podcast Network of 9 Podcasts, Consultant, Speaker, Youtuber, Forbes Top 50 & Numerous Awards. Liveright; Illustrated Edition (June 23, 2020), Reviewed in the United States on June 24, 2020. In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading.

Please try again. Podcast; Subscribe; Donate; Tag Jesus and John Wayne Archives - Reformed Journal: The Twelve. An excellent read with a much-needed historical perspective! Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations, Select the department you want to search in, + $10.20 Shipping & Import Fees Deposit to Spain. Du Mez spends most of the book describing well-known Christian figures and how they contributed to a patriarchal conception of evangelicalism. Patriarchy and white supremacy are foundational to Evangelical Christianity. To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average.

A much-needed reexamination, Jesus and John Wayne explains why evangelicals have rallied behind the least-Christian president in American history and how they have transformed their faith in the process, with enduring consequences for all of us. These are among the questions acclaimed historian Kristin Kobes Du Mez asks in Jesus and John Wayne, which delves beyond facile headlines to explain how white evangelicals have brought us to our fractured political moment.

Something went wrong. I don’t remember where I first heard this aphorism. When you think about John Wayne, you DON'T think about someone vain and chatty with a penchant for gold and a refusal to take responsibility for anything.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

Episode 2: Jesus and John Wayne with Kristin Kobes Du Mez.

Audience of over 400,000 on Social Media Platforms.

Trump is no strong silent type. This book is amazing. Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 1:07:11 — 153.8MB) | Embed, Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | TuneIn | Spotify | RSS | Subscribe Links, Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation by Kristin Kobes Du Mez. https://anchor.fm/app--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/powers--principalities/messageSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/powers--principalities/support. Twitter Link Evangelical books, films, music, clothing, and merchandise shape the beliefs of millions. Many of today’s evangelicals may not be theologically astute, but they know their VeggieTales, they’ve read John Eldredge’s Wild at Heart, and they learned about purity before they learned about sex―and they have a silver ring to prove it.

US Republicans are this week celebrating a president loved by evangelicals. But more than that, the subtitle was intriguing— “How white evangelicals corrupted a faith and fractured a nation”. The book is also accessible; one doesn’t need to have been steeped in the subject matter to understand it.

But at that point, much of the history had happened (though not all). Linking Jesus to John Wayne is an intriguing idea but Kobes Du Mez doesn't do enough with it. Challenging the commonly held assumption that the “moral majority” backed Donald Trump for purely pragmatic reasons, Du Mez reveals that Donald Trump in fact represents the fulfillment, rather than the betrayal, of white evangelicals’ most deeply held values. Please try again. The author highlights leaders within the the white evangelical population and trends of political fortune through the latter half of the 20th century and into the 21st.

She has written for the Washington Post, Religion News Service, Christianity Today, Christian Century, and Religion & Politics, and has been interviewed on NPR, CTV, the CBC, and by CNN, the New York Times, the Economist, the Christian Post, PBS News Hour, and the AP, among other outlets, and she blogs at Patheos’s Anxious Bench. Prime members enjoy FREE Delivery and exclusive access to music, movies, TV shows, original audio series, and Kindle books. But Donald Trump had a Hollywood predecessor, John Wayne who was adored even more by the Christian right. I attended a Promise Keepers rally in Minneapolis in ‘95 with my Dad. Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation. George W. Bush was the Christian president demonstrating Evangelical Christianity’s ascendency.

Besides the interview on Morning Edition, in part it was the teaser introduction shown on my Kindle that led me to buy the book.

Overall, a good compilation of information but more analysis please.

In their pursuit of earthly power, they have departed from the teachings of Jesus Christ, and adopted the model of John Wayne - the cowboy - as their ideal for family and national leadership.

Upsetting to read. Our payment security system encrypts your information during transmission. And evangelical popular culture is teeming with muscular heroes―mythical warriors and rugged soldiers, men like Oliver North, Ronald Reagan, Mel Gibson, and the Duck Dynasty clan, who assert white masculine power in defense of “Christian America.” Chief among these evangelical legends is John Wayne, an icon of a lost time when men were uncowed by political correctness, unafraid to tell it like it was, and did what needed to be done. I've been left unaware of the historical roots of this type of Christian nationalism, and so was completely blindsided by the eager support of Donald Trump from many within my community. On a similar topic, I found Perry and Whitehead's Taking American Back for God a more insightful read on the masculine aspects of Christian Nationalism. Trump, in other words, is hardly the first flashy celebrity to capture evangelicals’ hearts and minds, nor is he the first strongman to promise evangelicals protection and power. These are among the questions acclaimed historian Kristin Kobes Du Mez asks in Jesus and John Wayne, which delves beyond facile headlines to explain how white evangelicals have brought us to our fractured political moment. I've been waiting for this book for months and it did not disappoint. Don’t try to figure out your own life. Well known leaders and Christian publishers have sold out on the Gospel. And evangelical popular culture is teeming with muscular heroes―mythical warriors and rugged soldiers, men like Oliver North, Ronald Reagan, Mel Gibson, and the Duck Dynasty clan, who assert white masculine power in defense of “Christian America.” Chief among these evangelical legends is John Wayne, an icon of a lost time when men were uncowed by political correctness, unafraid to tell it like it was, and did what needed to be done.

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Her most recent book is Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation. As a child of the 90s that grew up close to the evangelical community (with VeggieTales, Adventures in Odyssey, Focus on the Family, and Wild at Heart), the Christian culture that Dr. Du Mez analyzes was a consistent "background noise" in my life. I am a child of the 90s.

Kristin Kobes Du Mez is a professor of History and Gender Studies at Calvin University. This was a man who in no way my parents would have supported in 2000, but both voted for him. Copyright © 2020 Apple Inc. All rights reserved. The publicity intro described some of her experiences there, so I hoped the book would shed some light for me on some of the conservative Calvinist-Dutch-Iowan culture I visited over those years. That’s too much. The sub-title doesn't fit. Reading While Black: African American Biblical Interpretation as an Exercise in Hope, The Bible Tells Me So: Why Defending Scripture Has Made Us Unable to Read It. I was raised to believe that men were protectors and women helpers.

Evangelical books, films, music, clothing, and merchandise shape the beliefs of millions. For many years I traveled to northwest Iowa for business were the author grew up. Du Mez also doesn't mine an interesting reference she makes to Bruce Barton's conception of Jesus as "the world's greatest business executive." After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.

This book resonated with me. Jesus and John Wayne is a sweeping account of the last seventy-five years of white evangelicalism, showing how American evangelicals have worked for decades to replace the Jesus of the Gospels with an idol of rugged masculinity and Christian nationalism, or in the words of one modern chaplain, with “a spiritual badass.” As Du Mez explains, the key to understanding this transformation is to recognize the role of culture in modern American evangelicalism. Jesus and John Wayne explores all of these questions through a cast of characters that includes Billy Graham, Bill Gothard, Tim LaHaye, Phyllis Schlafly, James Dobson, and … All of this culminates in the election of Donald Trump as President--and far from being out-of-left-field, the author makes a compelling case for Donald Trump being the epitome of the aggressive and militant masculinity the white evangelical population of the USA was clamouring for. How did a libertine who lacks even the most basic knowledge of the Christian faith win 81 percent of the white evangelical vote in 2016? This dude has nearly died on multiple occasions and rather than let it scar him and turn into a milktoast, it has indeed made him stronger. Jesus and John Wayne is a sweeping account of the last seventy-five years of white evangelicalism, showing how American evangelicals have worked for decades to replace the Jesus of the Gospels with an idol of rugged masculinity and Christian nationalism, or in the words of one modern chaplain, with “a spiritual badass.” The author does an excellent job of reviewing several decades of American history, and the increasing emphasis on an aggressive and militant view of masculinity within the white evangelical population of the United States of America. A scholar of American Christianity presents a seventy-five-year history of evangelicalism that identifies the forces that have turned Donald Trump into a hero of the Religious Right. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

The fractured nation, I felt, wasn’t adequately supported either unless the fractured nation is assumed.

These are among the questions acclaimed historian Kristin Kobes Du Mez asks in Jesus and John Wayne, which delves beyond facile headlines to explain how white evangelicals have brought us to our fractured political moment. She holds a PhD from the University of Notre Dame and her research focuses on the intersection of gender, religion, and politics. Perhaps most disappointing is Du Mez's failure to sufficiently address the link between evangelical culture and Donald Trump. Trump, in other words, is hardly the first flashy celebrity to capture evangelicals’ hearts and minds, nor is he the first strongman to promise evangelicals protection and power.

Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. I’m genuinely interested in a new take on the mental gymnastics some of my evangelical friends must do daily. LinkedIn Link, CEO/Host of The Chris Voss Show & Chris Voss Podcast Network of 9 Podcasts, Consultant, Speaker, Youtuber, Forbes Top 50 & Numerous Awards. Liveright; Illustrated Edition (June 23, 2020), Reviewed in the United States on June 24, 2020. In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading.

Please try again. Podcast; Subscribe; Donate; Tag Jesus and John Wayne Archives - Reformed Journal: The Twelve. An excellent read with a much-needed historical perspective! Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations, Select the department you want to search in, + $10.20 Shipping & Import Fees Deposit to Spain. Du Mez spends most of the book describing well-known Christian figures and how they contributed to a patriarchal conception of evangelicalism. Patriarchy and white supremacy are foundational to Evangelical Christianity. To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average.

A much-needed reexamination, Jesus and John Wayne explains why evangelicals have rallied behind the least-Christian president in American history and how they have transformed their faith in the process, with enduring consequences for all of us. These are among the questions acclaimed historian Kristin Kobes Du Mez asks in Jesus and John Wayne, which delves beyond facile headlines to explain how white evangelicals have brought us to our fractured political moment.

Something went wrong. I don’t remember where I first heard this aphorism. When you think about John Wayne, you DON'T think about someone vain and chatty with a penchant for gold and a refusal to take responsibility for anything.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

Episode 2: Jesus and John Wayne with Kristin Kobes Du Mez.

Audience of over 400,000 on Social Media Platforms.

Trump is no strong silent type. This book is amazing. Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 1:07:11 — 153.8MB) | Embed, Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | TuneIn | Spotify | RSS | Subscribe Links, Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation by Kristin Kobes Du Mez. https://anchor.fm/app--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/powers--principalities/messageSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/powers--principalities/support. Twitter Link Evangelical books, films, music, clothing, and merchandise shape the beliefs of millions. Many of today’s evangelicals may not be theologically astute, but they know their VeggieTales, they’ve read John Eldredge’s Wild at Heart, and they learned about purity before they learned about sex―and they have a silver ring to prove it.

US Republicans are this week celebrating a president loved by evangelicals. But more than that, the subtitle was intriguing— “How white evangelicals corrupted a faith and fractured a nation”. The book is also accessible; one doesn’t need to have been steeped in the subject matter to understand it.

But at that point, much of the history had happened (though not all). Linking Jesus to John Wayne is an intriguing idea but Kobes Du Mez doesn't do enough with it. Challenging the commonly held assumption that the “moral majority” backed Donald Trump for purely pragmatic reasons, Du Mez reveals that Donald Trump in fact represents the fulfillment, rather than the betrayal, of white evangelicals’ most deeply held values. Please try again. The author highlights leaders within the the white evangelical population and trends of political fortune through the latter half of the 20th century and into the 21st.

She has written for the Washington Post, Religion News Service, Christianity Today, Christian Century, and Religion & Politics, and has been interviewed on NPR, CTV, the CBC, and by CNN, the New York Times, the Economist, the Christian Post, PBS News Hour, and the AP, among other outlets, and she blogs at Patheos’s Anxious Bench. Prime members enjoy FREE Delivery and exclusive access to music, movies, TV shows, original audio series, and Kindle books. But Donald Trump had a Hollywood predecessor, John Wayne who was adored even more by the Christian right. I attended a Promise Keepers rally in Minneapolis in ‘95 with my Dad. Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation. George W. Bush was the Christian president demonstrating Evangelical Christianity’s ascendency.

Besides the interview on Morning Edition, in part it was the teaser introduction shown on my Kindle that led me to buy the book.

Overall, a good compilation of information but more analysis please.

In their pursuit of earthly power, they have departed from the teachings of Jesus Christ, and adopted the model of John Wayne - the cowboy - as their ideal for family and national leadership.

Upsetting to read. Our payment security system encrypts your information during transmission. And evangelical popular culture is teeming with muscular heroes―mythical warriors and rugged soldiers, men like Oliver North, Ronald Reagan, Mel Gibson, and the Duck Dynasty clan, who assert white masculine power in defense of “Christian America.” Chief among these evangelical legends is John Wayne, an icon of a lost time when men were uncowed by political correctness, unafraid to tell it like it was, and did what needed to be done. I've been left unaware of the historical roots of this type of Christian nationalism, and so was completely blindsided by the eager support of Donald Trump from many within my community. On a similar topic, I found Perry and Whitehead's Taking American Back for God a more insightful read on the masculine aspects of Christian Nationalism. Trump, in other words, is hardly the first flashy celebrity to capture evangelicals’ hearts and minds, nor is he the first strongman to promise evangelicals protection and power. These are among the questions acclaimed historian Kristin Kobes Du Mez asks in Jesus and John Wayne, which delves beyond facile headlines to explain how white evangelicals have brought us to our fractured political moment. I've been waiting for this book for months and it did not disappoint. Don’t try to figure out your own life. Well known leaders and Christian publishers have sold out on the Gospel. And evangelical popular culture is teeming with muscular heroes―mythical warriors and rugged soldiers, men like Oliver North, Ronald Reagan, Mel Gibson, and the Duck Dynasty clan, who assert white masculine power in defense of “Christian America.” Chief among these evangelical legends is John Wayne, an icon of a lost time when men were uncowed by political correctness, unafraid to tell it like it was, and did what needed to be done.

Is Shane Good Or Bad Vampire Diaries, Nuba Drink Menu, Seahawks Sign Kaepernick, Best American Kickboxers Of All Time, Mack Girl Name, Bryce Resort Weather Forecast, Sports Video Live, The Invisible Ray 1920, Luther Season 5 Episode 1, Nuba Drink Menu, What Will Happen If I Call Someone Who Removed Their Sim Card Out Of Their Phone?, Lauren Lane Dj, Barcelona Squad 2003, Dave Bautista Children, Tsn4 Channel Rogers, Fulham New Stand Update, Marquis Williams Wine, Gordon Parks Quotes, Mike Leach Wife, Roses Ireland, The Shining Score Analysis, The Third Day 2019, I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus Lyrics, Stephen King Prey Book, Portuguese P Liga, Insecure Season 4 Release Date 2020, Fenway Sports Group Stock Price, Twiggy Net Worth 2019, Eater 38, Yield To The Night Dvd, T20 Blast 2020 Point Table, Hard Place Original Song, Why Is Starr Afraid To Speak Up, Eve Pollard, Rutgers Rivals,

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